history of eyelashes - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes

On the heels of a fairly groundbreaking study that discovered that Eyelashes are always about 1/3 as long as the eye is large and that this is the perfect length for diverting airflow to keep eyes from drying, our main takeaway is that they're as substantial to our health as they are vital for our vanity.

To celebrate the function, they've played in the latter for women given that the first day, we're reviewing how eyelash patterns and treatments have developed through the years. But be forewarned, they range from impressively crafty to just plain dangerous.

1. The Androgynous Lashes of Ancient Egypt, 3500 B.C. - 2500 B.C.

Ladies, if you have ever caught your guy reaching for a mascara wand-- fear not. In Ancient Egypt, guys used to style their lashes just as often as women. They used kohl and lotions to darken the lashes, which also worked as protection for their eyes from the sun's damaging rays. Not to be outshined, women also used malachite on their lashes as they thought it worked as an aphrodisiac. We'll stay with oysters, thank you.

 
 

2. The Luscious Lashes of Ancient Rome, 753 BC to 476 AD

In Rome, eyelashes that were long, thick, and curled were a sought-after charm trait. Women utilized kohl and scorched cork to darken their eyelashes. Roman theorist Pliny the Elder wrote that lashes fell out from extreme sex-- yes, seriously-- so women would also care for them to show their purity.

3. The Barely-There Midlife Lashes, 1066 to 1485

During Middle ages Times, the forehead was considered to be the most beautiful and sensual feature of a woman's face. To even more highlight them, women often removed either most or all their eyelashes and eyebrows. That's definitely a look.

 

eyelashes in the 2000s 300x300 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes4. The Reddish Lashes of the Elizabethan Period, 1533 to 1603

When Queen Elizabeth took the throne, her reddish-golden hair was instantly en vogue and women colored their eyelashes to match. Nevertheless, this proved dangerous, as specific toxic compounds utilized led to the loss of hair. (Um, cute?) Considering that coloring lashes weren't an accepted custom in society, women would often do it in person, secretly using crushed berries and soot from fireplaces.

Mutnezemt, Ancient Egyptian queen of the 18th dynasty; an Unknown woman from Ancient Rome; an Unkown woman from the Middle Ages; Elizabeth I, Queen of England

 

5. The Slightly-Toxic Lashes of the Victorian Period, 1837 to 1901

It was throughout the Romantic age that cosmetics first entered into usage, although homemade substances and elixirs were still typical. Eugène Rimmel developed the very first mascara (yes, that Rimmel), a perfumer to Queen Victoria, and was mostly comprised of coal dust and Vaseline jelly. His invention caused quite a feeling.

6. The Newly-Minted Mascara Lashes of the Early 1900's.

Although alternatives were offered, many women were still looking for household products to make their own solutions. It's stated that in 1916, fake eyelashes were created by American film director David W. Griffith to create a fluttering lash impact for quiet film actresses. Even so, they didn't end up being popular till the '30s.

In 1917, a woman called Mabel Williams dealt with a drug maker to come up with "Lash-Brow-Ine," a formula made of petroleum jelly and oils to offer sheen. Eventually, their hallmark ended up being Maybelline, and over the next decade, they became a family name.

 

flapper with eyelash extentions 300x256 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes7. The Super-Curled Lashes of the 1920's and 1930's.

While there's inconsistency over who precisely invented the eyelash curler, a 1931 patent declares it was William McDonell who called it the Kurlash. It wasn't too various from the curling marvels of today made from stainless-steel and counterfeited scissors.

They became very popular as they curled the lashes

   

   

in just seconds and were relatively low-priced. In 1933, the term mascara entered play, and Maybelline developed a 10-cent package sold in drugstores.

8. The Waterproof Lashes of the 1940's and 1950's.

At the time, makeup was everything about emphasizing the peepers-- and painting cat eyes on the upper lashline, with fanned-out lashes to match, was a trend. In the early '40s, waterproof mascara solutions were presented and ended up being preferred. In 1958, Revlon introduced the very first mascara plan in a tube with a spiral-tip wand.

9. The Groovy Lashes of the 1960's and 1970's.

In 1960, Revlon invented the first colored formula with its "Brush on Mascara," which was available in hues like mauve and dark green. At the time, full, dramatic, and slightly-spidery lashes remained in, and more attention was given to the lower lashes than ever. Women also selected painted, brush-stroke lashes à la Twiggy.

 

eyelashes in the 80s 212x300 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their EyelashesIt continued in 1971 that cult-favorite Maybelline Great Lash, a water-based mascara, hit the marketplace. It is among our favorites to this day.

10. The Mixed Bag Lashes of the 1980's and 1990's.

In 1988, Max Factor created No Color Mascara, a clear formula that boasted a smudge-proof finish. Madonna was likewise at the height of appeal, making complete, fan-like eyelashes even more desirable.

In the more-is-more late 1980s & early 1990s, colored mascara also experienced a revival in Rainbow Brite colors. In truth, women utilized "hair mascara" to paint rainbow streaks in their hair.