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history of eyelashes - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes

On the heels of a fairly groundbreaking study that discovered that Eyelashes are always about 1/3 as long as the eye is large and that this is the perfect length for diverting airflow to keep eyes from drying, our main takeaway is that they're as substantial to our health as they are vital for our vanity.

To celebrate the function, they've played in the latter for women given that the first day, we're reviewing how eyelash patterns and treatments have developed through the years. But be forewarned, they range from impressively crafty to just plain dangerous.

1. The Androgynous Lashes of Ancient Egypt, 3500 B.C. - 2500 B.C.

Ladies, if you have ever caught your guy reaching for a mascara wand-- fear not. In Ancient Egypt, guys used to style their lashes just as often as women. They used kohl and lotions to darken the lashes, which also worked as protection for their eyes from the sun's damaging rays. Not to be outshined, women also used malachite on their lashes as they thought it worked as an aphrodisiac. We'll stay with oysters, thank you.

2. The Luscious Lashes of Ancient Rome, 753 BC to 476 AD

In Rome, eyelashes that were long, thick, and curled were a sought-after charm trait. Women utilized kohl and scorched cork to darken their eyelashes. Roman theorist Pliny the Elder wrote that lashes fell out from extreme sex-- yes, seriously-- so women would also care for them to show their purity.

3. The Barely-There Midlife Lashes, 1066 to 1485

During Middle ages Times, the forehead was considered to be the most beautiful and sensual feature of a woman's face. To even more highlight them, women often removed either most or all their eyelashes and eyebrows. That's definitely a look.

 

eyelashes in the 2000s 300x300 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes4. The Reddish Lashes of the Elizabethan Period, 1533 to 1603

When Queen Elizabeth took the throne, her reddish-golden hair was instantly en vogue and women colored their eyelashes to match. Nevertheless, this proved dangerous, as specific toxic compounds utilized led to the loss of hair. (Um, cute?) Considering that coloring lashes weren't an accepted custom in society, women would often do it in person, secretly using crushed berries and soot from fireplaces.

Mutnezemt, Ancient Egyptian queen of the 18th dynasty; an Unknown woman from Ancient Rome; an Unkown woman from the Middle Ages; Elizabeth I, Queen of England

 

5. The Slightly-Toxic Lashes of the Victorian Period, 1837 to 1901

It was throughout the Romantic age that cosmetics first entered into usage, although homemade substances and elixirs were still typical. Eugène Rimmel developed the very first mascara (yes, that Rimmel), a perfumer to Queen Victoria, and was mostly comprised of coal dust and Vaseline jelly. His invention caused quite a feeling.

6. The Newly-Minted Mascara Lashes of the Early 1900's.

Although alternatives were offered, many women were still looking for household products to make their own solutions. It's stated that in 1916, fake eyelashes were created by American film director David W. Griffith to create a fluttering lash impact for quiet film actresses. Even so, they didn't end up being popular till the '30s.

In 1917, a woman called Mabel Williams dealt with a drug maker to come up with "Lash-Brow-Ine," a formula made of petroleum jelly and oils to offer sheen. Eventually, their hallmark ended up being Maybelline, and over the next decade, they became a family name.

 

flapper with eyelash extentions 300x256 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their Eyelashes7. The Super-Curled Lashes of the 1920's and 1930's.

While there's inconsistency over who precisely invented the eyelash curler, a 1931 patent declares it was William McDonell who called it the Kurlash. It wasn't too various from the curling marvels of today made from stainless-steel and counterfeited scissors.

They became very popular as they curled the lashes in just seconds and were relatively low-priced. In 1933, the term mascara entered play, and Maybelline developed a 10-cent package sold in drugstores.

8. The Waterproof Lashes of the 1940's and 1950's.

At the time, makeup was everything about emphasizing the peepers-- and painting cat eyes on the upper lashline, with fanned-out lashes to match, was a trend. In the early '40s, waterproof mascara solutions were presented and ended up being preferred. In 1958, Revlon introduced the very first mascara plan in a tube with a spiral-tip wand.

9. The Groovy Lashes of the 1960's and 1970's.

In 1960, Revlon invented the first colored formula with its "Brush on Mascara," which was available in hues like mauve and dark green. At the time, full, dramatic, and slightly-spidery lashes remained in, and more attention was given to the lower lashes than ever. Women also selected painted, brush-stroke lashes à la Twiggy.

 

eyelashes in the 80s 212x300 - A Historical Timeline of Women and their EyelashesIt continued in 1971 that cult-favorite Maybelline Great Lash, a water-based mascara, hit the marketplace. It is among our favorites to this day.

10. The Mixed Bag Lashes of the 1980's and 1990's.

In 1988, Max Factor created No Color Mascara, a clear formula that boasted a smudge-proof finish. Madonna was likewise at the height of appeal, making complete, fan-like eyelashes even more desirable.

In the more-is-more late 1980s & early 1990s, colored mascara also experienced a revival in Rainbow Brite colors. In truth, women utilized "hair mascara" to paint rainbow streaks in their hair.

dog with eyelashes 1 - Dogs with Fake Eyelashes are Now a Thing!

 

Right now, it's not a huge thing by any stretch yet. However, for much better or even worse, this does exist! Earlier this month, Japanese Twitter user @miomio3030 uploaded images of a Pomeranian with unused faux lashes.

 

The image, which you can see below, was retweeted over 10 thousand times.

 

fake eyelashes on dog - Dogs with Fake Eyelashes are Now a Thing!

 

The fake eyelashes were placed above the animal's eyes-- instead of, you know, in fact using them to the pup. Online, many discovered the result rather amusing, saying the lashes made the lovable dog even cuter.

Over the years, there were other examples of this in Japan. Pets with lashes are very much a niche thing, so don't think all animal owners in Japan are doing this!

Hopefully, these family pet owners ensured their four-legged friends didn't accidentally consume the lashes or poke themselves in the eye with them. Still, take a look:

 

 

audrey hepburns eyelash trick - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash TrickClumpy lashes may be having a minute, but I've always preferred a more natural-looking approach when it concerns maximizing my lashes. So instead of idolizing those with a heavy-handed mascara approach, like a Twiggy or Kim Kardashian, Audrey Hepburn has my doe-eyed idol.

Actress Audrey Hepburn, star of Breakfast at Tiffany's, remains one of Hollywood's greatest style icons and one of the world's most successful actresses.

While Hepburn liked to darken, plump, and lengthen like the best of them, she had one trick to ensure that her lashes looked naturally fanned-out and clump-free-- and it wasn't a magic mascara wand.

After using a layer of mascara, her makeup artist Alberto de Rossi would take a pin and meticulously separate every single lash.

 

Yes, it's a painstaking-- the average upper eyelid has an average of 70 to 150 lashes-- and potentially dangerous process because, ouch. But, in my mind, it's a little rate to pay on the quest for Hepburn's classic gaze. So, just recently, I asked makeup artist Joseph Carrillo to give me the very same treatment with his clump-busting tool of option: a sewing pin. It took about 5 minutes per set of lashes (10 very mindful minutes in overall) and sufficed it to say. A small silver pin has officially become a staple of my tightly-edited makeup bag. Here's how it went down:

 

audrey hepburns eyelash tricksq 150x150 - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash Trick1: Curl and Coat

Before you get pin-happy, curl your lashes as you usually would, if at all. Carillo used Shu Uemura's cult-favorite eyelash curler to amp things up before applying two coats of Dior Diorshow Extase Mascara.

audrey hepburns eyelash trick2 150x150 - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash Trick2: Separate Lashes with a Pin

Start at the base near the waterline and pull the pin through to the top, separating each specific lash. This defines each lash, in addition to helps distribute the dark mascara pigment more evenly. When you finish the first eye, repeat on the next and proceed to your lower cover lashes if you 'd like.

 

3: Voilà!

 

recreating audrey hepburns eyelash trick - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash Trick

 

As you can see, my lashes are clump-free for a total more natural, yet equally impactful look à la Hepburn. Mia's  Note: If you're fearful that you do not have the time or that the chances are stacked versus you not to stab yourself in the eye, I feel you. In that case, use the pin on the clumpiest sections instead of each specific lash * or * attempt an eyelash comb to brush-through lashes simultaneously.

 

 

About The Queen of Lashes Herself

Audrey Hepburn (/ˈhɛpbɜːrn/; born Audrey Kathleen Ruston; 4 May 1929 – 20 January 1993) was a British actress, model, dancer and humanitarian. Recognised as a film and fashion icon, Hepburn was active during Hollywood's Golden Age. She was ranked by the American Film Institute as the third-greatest female screen legend in Golden Age Hollywood, and was inducted into the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame.

Born in Ixelles, a municipality near Brussels, Hepburn spent her childhood between Belgium, England, and the Netherlands. In Amsterdam, she studied ballet with Sonia Gaskell, before moving to London in 1948, continuing her ballet training with Marie Rambert, and then performing as a chorus girl in West End musical theatre productions.

audrey hepburns eyelash tricks 300x300 - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash TrickFollowing minor appearances in several films, Hepburn starred in the 1951 Broadway play Gigi, after being spotted by French novelist Colette, on whose work the play was based. She shot to stardom for playing the lead role in Roman Holiday (1953), for which she was the first actress to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award, and a BAFTA Award for a single performance. That same year, Hepburn won a Tony Award for Best Lead Actress in a Play for her performance in Ondine. She went on to star in a number of successful films, such as Sabrina (1954), The Nun's Story (1959), Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), Charade (1963), My Fair Lady (1964), and Wait Until Dark (1967), for which she received an Academy Award, Golden Globe, and BAFTA nominations. Hepburn won three BAFTA Awards for Best British Actress in a Leading Role. In recognition of her film career, she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from BAFTA, the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award, and the Special Tony Award. She remains one of only 12 people who have won Academy, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Awards.

audrey hepburn star of fame - Recreating Audrey Hepburn's Signature Eyelash TrickHepburn appeared in fewer films as her life went on, devoting much of her later life to UNICEF. She had contributed to the organisation since 1954, then worked in some of the poorest communities of Africa, South America and Asia between 1988 and 1992. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her work as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in December 1992. A month later, Hepburn died of appendiceal cancer at her home in Switzerland at the age of 63.

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